Inventors:

Butz —> Honeywell
Johnson —> Johnson Controls
WP Powers —> Siemens BT


Encountered--
Time: September 3, 2018
Place: Late night google rabbit hole
Pointer from: General curiosity re the development of automatic controls systems in the US
Source: See below

Note type: Direct



Honeywell


Warren Johnson was granted patents for his electric thermostat in 1883, established the Johnson Electric Service Company in 1885 and went on to develop a complete range of pneumatic controls. The company now operates world-wide.

Meanwhile at the same time in Minneapolis, Albert Butz invented his damper flapper for heating furnace control and formed the Butz Thermo-Electric Regulator Company. When he left the company in 1888, it became the Consolidated Temperature Controlling Company which struggled financially. With the assistance of William Sweatt its fortunes improved and it became the Minneapolis Heat Regulator Company in 1912. In the 1920’s, its largest competitor was the Honeywell Heating Speciality Company which had been started by Mark Honeywell. In 1927, William Sweatt and Mark Honeywell merged their companies to form the Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator Company which grew to operate world-wide as Honeywell.



Johnson Controls




“Johnson’s most notable contribution to temperature control was the automatic multizone temperature control system- a pneumatic system that used a bi-metal thermostat to control air flow through a nozzle and thereby operate a pilot regulator. The amplified air signal from the regulator was then used to control a steam or hot water valve on a heat exchanger, or to control a damper of a forced air system. (US Patent No. 542,733)."— 1895 patent for heat regulating apparatus



WP Powers (today: Siemens BT)




G PHYSICS
G05 CONTROLLING; REGULATING
G05D SYSTEMS FOR CONTROLLING OR REGULATING NON-ELECTRIC VARIABLES
G05D23/00 Control of temperature
G05D23/19 Control of temperature characterised by the use of electric means
G05D23/275 Control of temperature characterised by the use of electric means with sensing element expanding, contracting, or fusing in response to changes of temperature